Sunday, July 13, 2014

Virtual Garden Tour

When I recently saw Common Household Mom propose the idea of a Virtual Garden Tour, my first thought was, "Aw.  Too bad I don't qualify."  Because in order to participate in a garden tour, you need gardens, of course, of the studied, orderly, English variety.  Sure, I love to garden, and sure, I love to take low-quality photos of my flowers to the point that my camera has more pictures of flora on it than Crisler-begotten fauna.  Besides, my sunflowers aren't blooming yet, and without them, there's just no point.

Still, I've been reading some terrific stuff lately about how perfectionism is the death of productivity and creativity and probably more important things like the Oxford comma, so... here goes.  Here's what's blooming in my neck of the woods.



Daylilies!  A couple years ago my mom's husband's niece (still with me?) moved to a house in Wichita that had previously been home to an older gentleman who had been a member of the Wichita Daylily Society (how wild and raucous do you reckon those meetings are?) and had planted all kinds of daylilies all over the yard.  This niece isn't much of a flower person (fortunately I have met her and she is exceedingly nice, and thus did not allow my brain to judge her too harshly), and so chose to do the right thing and gave a bunch to me.  Well, she gave buckets-full to my mom and Mark, and they shared some with me.  Whatever.  So this year I have several new and unexpected splashes of color around our yard, although I can already tell I'm going to need to re-transplant several varieties; not enough sun on some of them.

This one came with a little plaque that reads "'Firepower' E.W. Brown-1984."  I'm assuming E.W. is the person who created this hybrid?  Or something?



The next two were already here; I planted them a few years ago.  I love them just as much as the flashy new guys, and tell them so every time I'm outside.


These are less orange and more of a buttery-yellow outside of my demon camera.




The above red ones look similar to the Huning lilies I wrote about recently, except they have more red and aren't taller than I am.  They're wet because it never stops raining in Iowa.  At least not this summer.


The coneflowers are also blooming:


They're usually home to a few spiderwebs:



And speaking of spiderwebs-



I'm convinced Viktor weaves these webs nightly, doing his part to protect our family.  


You can't take two steps across our grass without encountering one of these.  It's funny, spiders completely eek me out when they're in the house, but outside, I want to see as many as possible, perhaps because this is what our children look like right now:


Click to embiggen and see Cade's poor, poor forehead.

A cool, wet summer means millions upon millions of mosquitoes, all feasting upon the flesh of my babies.  This angers me.  It angers me greatly.

Not all the bugs are ire-provoking, however.  I spent an absurd amount of time watching this little fella on a sunflower leaf this morning.  He was right at eye-level, after all.


Anybody know what this multi-colored friend might be?  Because I am, as usual, clueless.

The vegetable garden's sending out its first produce of the summer (aside from the mass quantities of lettuce it attempted to drown us in, of course):





And look here- the gourds are starting to grow!  I could have sworn I planted 10 Commandments here, but this doesn't look quite right, so... blargh.  One of these years I really, really will start a gardening journal.  I mean it this time.



The zucchini are also just gearing up, and it's beginning to look like I'm going to be breaking and entering people's homes just to leave some surprise zucchini and get it out of my garden.  I'll be the Zucchini Fairy, which is like the Tooth Fairy except I won't traffic in human body parts!  


That's it:  An Iowa garden in July.  Thanks for hosting, CHM!






6 comments:

  1. You have tomatoes already! Wow! It doesn't seem to matter when you plant them here, they don't really get going until the end of June, so most of ours are green or still in the bud stage. (Hello, bud. Please turn into a juicy red bit of garden candy!)
    I have a link about zucchini... another idea of how to gift them to other people, compliments of my husband and his sister.
    Those daylilies are beautiful, including varieties I've never seen before, and I am looking longingly at your coneflowers.
    My mom's husband's niece = my step-cousin (I know this because I have one and she is also quite kind-hearted.) (I might have made up in the moniker but it works.)

    PS: I have been known to look like your kids when it comes to mosquito bites. They haven't been too bad this year where I live, luckily.
    Bats eat mosquitoes. Maybe you want to install a nice bat box?

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  2. I have daylily envy now. Those colors are out of this world! That's so great that you are already harvesting tomatoes, and have a pepper on the plant, and no nasty critters have come by to eat them.

    I think those web-like things on the grass might be some other creature, not a spider. Not sure.

    That poor child, with those mosquito bites.

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  3. Ooohhh, your beautiful flowers! I am cheering on your spiders to eat up all of those nasty mosquitoes. That poor forehead brings back memories.

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  4. Wow! Those daylilies are amazing! How lucky to stumble on a collection by someone who was part of a daylily society! I'll bet there are all kinds of special hybrids in that garden.

    I also envy the coneflowers --I have not had much luck with them, and the ones that do bloom seem to coincide with the Japanese Beetles. Looks like yours are beautiful and free of damage.

    That little colorful bug is amazing! I wish I knew what it was.

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  5. You TOTALLY qualify! Your lilies are amazing! Dang those bugs! Poor baby forehead!

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  6. Coneflowers! I want coneflowers. Maybe they would take over the world and crowd out the ferns. Or - maybe not. I love your variety of daylilies! I only have the plain orange, and I love them.

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